The significance of the Regents of the University of California v. Bakke (1978) case is that it A. declared busing to be unconstitutional B. led to the integration of schools C. solidified the...

The significance of the Regents of the University of California v. Bakke (1978) case is that it
 A. declared busing to be unconstitutional
 B. led to the integration of schools
 C. solidified the use of quotas regarding college admissions
 D. signaled the approval of affirmative action
 E. upheld segregated educational facilities

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pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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The correct answer to this question is Option D.  It is not what most people remember about the Bakke case, but it is the only answer that is actually accurate.

In the Bakke case, the Supreme Court of the United States ruled that the University of California’s medical school admission policy was unconstitutional because it set quotas for how many nonwhites were to be admitted.  The policy had said that 16 out of the 100 people admitted had to be minority.  Since this case outlawed quotas, Option C is not right.

Even though this case outlawed quotas, it did not outlaw affirmative action.  Instead, it said that colleges were allowed to take race into account in admissions decisions.  Affirmative action was legal, but strict quotas were not.  Therefore, Option D is the best answer.

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