I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud

by William Wordsworth
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Critically comment on the romantic features of "I Wandered Lonely As A Cloud."

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Until the poet is in communion with Nature he is "lonely as a cloud," but when his spirit connects with the lovely sight of the daffodils, he "could not but be gay" with the "wealth the show to me had brought."

Wordsworth's mention of the "inward eye" that is the...

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Until the poet is in communion with Nature he is "lonely as a cloud," but when his spirit connects with the lovely sight of the daffodils, he "could not but be gay" with the "wealth the show to me had brought."

Wordsworth's mention of the "inward eye" that is the "bliss of solitude" reminds the reader of Emerson who said that he had become "a transparent eyeball" because he felt that

The lover of nature is he whose inward and outward senses are still truly adjusted to each other...In the presence of nature, a wild delight runs through the man, in spite of real sorrows. 

So, too, is the poet in the bliss of Nature.  Truly, this poem contains Romantic elements in its harmony of joy in both man and nature.

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