Show how Nora has changed in A Doll's House from Act I to Act III using quotes.  

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Nora has undergone a complete change by the end of A Doll’s House as she exerts her independent spirit and willingness to educate herself as an individual.

In act 1, Ibsen depicts Nora as accepting of her husband’s condescension. Torvald ’s nicknames go unchallenged by Nora, who is happy to...

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Nora has undergone a complete change by the end of A Doll’s House as she exerts her independent spirit and willingness to educate herself as an individual.

In act 1, Ibsen depicts Nora as accepting of her husband’s condescension. Torvald’s nicknames go unchallenged by Nora, who is happy to accept her circumstances. Eager to pay back her debt, Nora constantly asks Torvald for money; he interprets her requests as proof that she is an “extravagant little person.” Nora has learned that a little flirtation will go a long way, so she uses her charms on Torvald and allows him to act as if she has no brain. “You haven’t any idea how many expenses we skylarks and squirrels have,” she tells Torvald in order to get more money.

However, we soon learn that Nora is quite shrewd and more intelligent than people give her credit for. She is willing to do anything for her loved ones. In the past, she committed forgery in order to save Torvald’s life, and she now is slowly paying back her debt so he won’t find out. She is not the simple, senseless spendthrift that Torvald would have us believe.

Nora grows up a great deal throughout the play, as she begins to realize that there are consequences to keeping such a great secret. When Krogstad first threatens to reveal her secret to Torvald, she tells him “impetuously” to do it, since she is confident that Torvald will save her and pay Krogstad. But, as time goes by and she hears Torvald’s ideas on how a mother’s bad influence can poison the children, she begins to fear that she is hurting her own children. The pride she had felt in keeping her secret gives way to fear. Eventually, at Christine’s urging, Nora recognizes that she must be honest with Torvald and accept whatever results come from that honesty.

Nora’s epiphany comes when Torvald, having discovered Nora’s secret, does not step up to save her. Instead, he berates her and expresses concern over his own reputation. When Krogstad decides not to blackmail them, Torvald resumes his condescending ways, prompting Nora to realize that he is not the person she thought he was and that this is not the life she wants anymore. She cannot raise her children if she does not have her own identity. She recognizes that “duties to myself” must be most important now. Torvald explains that a man cannot sacrifice his life for his love, to which Nora reminds him “It is a thing hundreds of thousands of women have done.” She will do it no longer.

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Nora's changes relate largely to the development of her ability to be honest, independent and self-determined. 

Initially, Nora is seen sneaking macaroons when Torvald cannot see her. Keeping this secret shows that she is, to some extent, willing to be subservient to Torvald. She will not follow all of his orders, but she also will not openly break his rules. 

Quotes relating to Nora's attempts at secrecy are present in Nora's first discussion with Mrs. Linde.

Later Nora continues to expect Torvald to save her from the predicament with Krogstad. She is dependent on his good will and hopes for a "miracle". When this miracle is not forthcoming and Torvald's response to discovering Nora's situation is a selfish one, Nora finally forces herself to the realization that she must learn to depend on herself. She must develop her own opinions. 

She no longer keeps her feelings secret after her trouble with Krogstad is aired. Instead, she boldly confronts Torvald and begins to make her own demands and to dictate how things will change. 

Here, in the final act, Nora characterizes the situation instead of allowing it to be characterized for her (or to be characterized by it):

Nora claims, “You never loved me. You just enjoyed being in love with me.”

Her new attitude indicates the great change that has taken place in her, which leads her to leave her husband and children so that she can develop as an individual. No longer meek, she is now assertive. 

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