Show how Atticus proves in part two that he lives the values he teaches his children in "To Kill a Mockingbird". Choose at least one incident and explain how he displays.displays courage,...

Show how Atticus proves in part two that he lives the values he teaches his children in "To Kill a Mockingbird".

Choose at least one incident and explain how he displays.displays courage, honesty,thoughtful action rather than violence, or seeing things from anothers view. expalin how his actions prove he lives bu the vlaues he teaches

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engtchr5 | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Associate Educator

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Two instances that demonstrate how Atticus lives what he "preaches" include the scene at the county jail, and Atticus's overall defense of Tom Robinson.

As the mob approaches him at the jail, Atticus doesn't prepare to defend himself with violence, but rather, folds his newspaper calmly, and offers Walter Cunningham an option: "You can always turn around and go home, Walter," says a cool-headed Atticus, blocking the door to the jail with his chair. He doesn't rise as if to fight, he doesn't ball up his fists, but instead, level-headedly responds to each statement by the mob until Scout dispels them by softening their hearts.

Atticus was appointed to defend Tom Robinson by the courts, but he could have decided to represent him shoddily or poorly; he didn't. He defended Tom Robinson just as if he were another neighbor, friend, or client -- color didn't matter. Atticus's attitude toward those of diverse backgrounds serves to reinforce the lessons he's taught Scout and Jem throughout the novel; whether that's "Don't say ni--er, Scout; it's common," or whether it's his tactful disagreements with Aunt Alexandra about the rights of the minority, Atticus's opinions about fairness are reinforced by his actions.

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