Should passive euthanasia be made legal in India?The question that has arised ever since the verdict passed during the case of Aruna Shaunbag, who has been suffering for over 37 years in King...

Should passive euthanasia be made legal in India?

The question that has arised ever since the verdict passed during the case of Aruna Shaunbag, who has been suffering for over 37 years in King Edward Memorial Hospital in Mumbai is that should passive euhanasia be made legal in India in order to relieve patients from unnecessary suffering when in a permanent vegitative state?

Asked on by sharan9

4 Answers | Add Yours

litteacher8's profile pic

litteacher8 | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

If a person is in a vegetative state, he or she cannot give consent. I don't agree with euthanasia in general, but if you consider that in nature the person would be dead that's another matter. Machines are artificially keeping the person alive, and I don't think that's right either.
justaguide's profile pic

justaguide | College Teacher | (Level 2) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

Apart from the moral issues involved with passive euthanasia in general, in India I do not think this is something that can be allowed.

The legal framework in India is just not adequate to deal with this. Even if in a majority of cases the intention behind putting a person out of his/her misery could be genuine, unless there is a proper infrastructure in place to deal with all the issues involved, the risks of it being used for ulterior motives is too great.

pohnpei397's profile pic

pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

I would argue that euthanasia should never be legal without the consent of the person who would die.  It does seem to make sense to allow a person who has been vegetative for that long to die, but where would you draw the line?  When would it be legal for someone to decide when another person should be euthanized?  It seems to me that there would be great potential for abuse there.

Now, if the person is being kept alive by machines and would die without them, I think it is acceptable to remove the life support system.  In other words, if a person needs the machines to allow them to breathe or to circulate their blood, then I think it is acceptable (with family consent) to unplug those machines and let the person die naturally.  But if the person is not going to die naturally, then they should not be euthanized.

sharan9's profile pic

sharan9 | Student, Undergraduate | eNotes Newbie

Posted on

I would argue that euthanasia should never be legal without the consent of the person who would die.  It does seem to make sense to allow a person who has been vegetative for that long to die, but where would you draw the line?  When would it be legal for someone to decide when another person should be euthanized?  It seems to me that there would be great potential for abuse there.

Now, if the person is being kept alive by machines and would die without them, I think it is acceptable to remove the life support system.  In other words, if a person needs the machines to allow them to breathe or to circulate their blood, then I think it is acceptable (with family consent) to unplug those machines and let the person die naturally.  But if the person is not going to die naturally, then they should not be euthanized.

I absolutely agree with what you say. In cases where even the consent of the patient cannot be taken as the patient is not in a condition to be asked about his/her opinion,is it right to ask his family members?Do you not think that if this is allowed, it can create easy opportunities for misuse of this right to gain an easy advantage for relatives  looking forawrd to the death of the patient for personal advantages like property,claim over insurance etc?

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