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Should middle/junior high school students be retained? I am an 8th grade History teacher at a 7th/8th grade junior high.  In the two years at this school, students take 24 classes for a semester...

Should middle/junior high school students be retained?

I am an 8th grade History teacher at a 7th/8th grade junior high.  In the two years at this school, students take 24 classes for a semester grade.  Each semester grade is worth 5 credits for a possible total of 120 credits.  A student must have 110 credits to participate in promotion.  Last year I had a student who had failed 17 of those 24 classes and only had 35 credits.  Yet, because his mother put up such a fuss, the student will neither be retained nor sent to the alternative school for 7th/8th/9th graders, but will go on to the high school.  I found this incredible.

My question, should students who do not have enough credits to go through promotion be retained?

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martinjmurphy eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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I began this discussion and would like to respond to drmonica post # 10.  It seems to me that drmonica is laying the blame for this student's academic record on his teachers and that his teachers need to motivate these students to do well.  The student who I refered to in my initial post  had at least 10 different teachers who gave him a failing grade.  Many of these teachers have been recognized for being outstanding educators.  I am just wondering what drmonica might suggest these middle school teachers do to motivate their students.

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drmonica eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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Retention of students in junior high school is one...

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krishna-agrawala | Student

The system of passing or promoting the students on the basis of results of exams or credits earned by them is being debated by many responsible educationists. However, I do not think that any responsible person would support promotion of students on the basis of amount of fuss put in by their mothers.

It appears quite unlikely to me that a school would have taken the kind of action described in post #1, unless the fuss created by the mother did uncover some serious discrepancies in awarding credit to the student affected.

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