In the short story "Boys and Girls" by Alice Munro, why is it significant that the girl or narrator is not named in the story?

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It could be said that the narrator is unnamed because the author wants to make general points about the nature of gender roles and relations between the sexes. In other words, the experiences of the narrator could just as easily happen to any other girl in her situation. By not...

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It could be said that the narrator is unnamed because the author wants to make general points about the nature of gender roles and relations between the sexes. In other words, the experiences of the narrator could just as easily happen to any other girl in her situation. By not giving her main character a name, Alice Munro is universalizing her experience, making it something to which many of her female readers will themselves relate.

The narrator is a kind of Everywoman character who needs to make a choice as to what kind of woman she wants to be when she grows up, whether it's the soft, feminine ideal of womanhood valorized by her grandmother, the more vigorous, mannish outdoors-type favored by her father, or perhaps a combination of both or something else entirely. Either way, the narrator finds herself in a similar position to many women in their lives, hence her namelessness. For this is a young girl still in the process of forging her own unique identity.

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