In "Shooting An Elephant," how did the Burmese people express their feelings towards British people?  

Expert Answers

An illustration of the letter 'A' in a speech bubbles

That the Burmese hate the British is made very clear in "Shooting an Elephant" and, in this essay, Orwell provides a number of examples to support this claim.

In the bazaar (the market), for instance, the Burmese would "spit betel juice" on the dress of a European...

See
This Answer Now

Start your 48-hour free trial to unlock this answer and thousands more. Enjoy eNotes ad-free and cancel anytime.

Start your 48-Hour Free Trial

That the Burmese hate the British is made very clear in "Shooting an Elephant" and, in this essay, Orwell provides a number of examples to support this claim.

In the bazaar (the market), for instance, the Burmese would "spit betel juice" on the dress of a European woman and the priests would "jeer" when out on a street corner. In another example, Orwell talks about a football game in which he was tripped up by a Burmese man while the referee ("another Burman") did nothing. 

It is, perhaps, interesting to note that the Burmese demonstrate their hate towards the British through a number of small, localised incidents. They do not, as Orwell states, have "the guts to raise a riot." Instead, they act when they encounter a British person alone and when they have the safety of other Burmese people to rely on. This is very telling of the nature of imperialism: the Burmese know that outright rebellion would only lead to suffering and harsh punishment and they are not prepared to take that sort of risk. 

Approved by eNotes Editorial Team