In "Shooting an Elephant," George Orwell: (A) uses a style that is complicated and contradictory, (B) writes clearly and plainly, (C) distances himself from the events with a fictional narrator, or...

In "Shooting an Elephant," George Orwell: (A) uses a style that is complicated and contradictory, (B) writes clearly and plainly, (C) distances himself from the events with a fictional narrator, or (D) kills the elephant with one shot.

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poetrymfa eNotes educator| Certified Educator

George Orwell's essay "Shooting an Elephant" describes the exact experience that the title suggests: shooting an elephant while working in Burma as a police officer. This event, which operates metaphorically as a symbol of the consequences of British imperialism, is a painful one for the essay's narrator. Despite the elephant eventually calming down, a crowd insists that it be shot, and the narrator does so, using multiple bullets to take down the creature.

Thus, the answer to your question is "B." George Orwell writes clearly and plainly about the event from a first person perspective, acknowledging the "tyranny" of a white man who destroys his own freedom in his pursuit of and hunger for power. The narrator has chosen to kill the elephant despite his inhibitions because, "...my whole life, every white man's life in the East, was one long struggle not to be laughed at." 

pohnpei397 eNotes educator| Certified Educator

Of these options, I believe that B is the correct answer.

It cannot be D.  He uses all five of the bullets that he has -- shoots the elephant with all of them.

It cannot be C.  He speaks in the first person throughout the essay.

It is not A.  The writing in this essay is very straightforward and easy to understand.

So it must be B.  As you read the essay, you should notice how plainly he speaks.  He talks very clearly about how the Burmese would spit on a white woman's dress.  He talks very plainly about what he wanted and did not want to do about the elephant, etc.