If Shelley could write a letter to Ozymandias, what would he write?  

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Shelley was no respecter of authority, and he certainly didn't have much time for kings, so it's fair to say that any letter he wrote to Ozymandias , the great Egyptian king, would not have been very respectful. He would have accused Ozymandias of being arrogant in expecting his monument...

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Shelley was no respecter of authority, and he certainly didn't have much time for kings, so it's fair to say that any letter he wrote to Ozymandias, the great Egyptian king, would not have been very respectful. He would have accused Ozymandias of being arrogant in expecting his monument to stand forever, inspiring fear and awe among all those who laid eyes on it. He would have reminded the king that earthly achievements are precisely that, and have no God-given right to live on into eternity. Furthermore, Shelley would've said that if you wish your name to endure after your death, then while you're alive you need to establish a reputation for being more than just a tyrant. Otherwise, your posthumous reputation, like the monuments and statues to your tyrannical power, will simply crumble into the dust.

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In his poem entitled 'Ozymandias' Shelley skilfully paints the picture of an overbearing and haughty king of ancient Egypt (generally equated with Ramses II) of whom nothing now remains, except parts of his statue. The poem carries a moral: that even the most powerful of kings cannot last, that human beings and all their works are destined to pass away. Therefore if Shelley were to write a letter to Ozymandias he would most likely remind him of this; his letter would be in the nature of a warning.

This poem of Shelley's, one of his most famous, ties in with the ever-increasing interest in Ancient Egypt at the beginning of the nineteenth century, as archaelogical excavations turned up ever more awe-inspiring evidence of this great ancient civilisation, culminating in the discovery of Tutankhamun's tomb in the early twentieth century.

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