In Shakespeare's "As you like it" there should be a phrase sounding like "If it isn't love at first sight, it is no love". Where is it?  It relates to Phebe and Silvius. I am not sure about who is...

In Shakespeare's "As you like it" there should be a phrase sounding like "If it isn't love at first sight, it is no love". Where is it?

 

It relates to Phebe and Silvius. I am not sure about who is pronouncing it (probably Phebe). I looked through many Shakespeare quotes but I could not find it. Thanks for you help!

Expert Answers
pohnpei397 eNotes educator| Certified Educator

I think that I know which lines you are talking about.  I think that you are talking about something that comes from Act III, Scene 5.  The lines I have in mind are spoken by Phebe, just as you said.  And they seem to have the same sort of meaning that you are looking for. Here is the line I think you are talking about:

Dead shepherd, now I find thy saw of might:
'Who ever lov'd that lov'd not at first sight?'

This is spoken about halfway through the scene, around Line 90.  The "dead shepherd" that she talks about here is Christopher Marlowe, who was a friend of Shakespeare's.  The "saw" is not a saw for cutting things, but a saying.

shadeslayer | Student

The answer given is perfect. Just to add to it, Phebe has got enamoured by Rosalind (who is in disguise as Ganymede) assuming her to be a man, and (Phebe) tells her lover Silvius these lines from Act III Scene V. The lines within double quotes are probably taken from a poem named "Hero and Leander".

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As You Like It

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