What are words and phrases that the author uses to create effects in "The Beast of Bodmin Moor"? Focus on this part: A little further along I took a turning with a handwritten sign pointing to...

What are words and phrases that the author uses to create effects in "The Beast of Bodmin Moor"?

Focus on this part:

A little further along I took a turning with a handwritten sign pointing to ‘Gables Farm’. I had to leave the car and cross a rickety, rotting footbridge over a rushing stream. Another battered sign, nailed to a tree, bore the ominous words, ambiguously addressed: ‘Wild Big Cats – Keep Out’. A shiny, weather-beaten man with tremendous whiskers and a crusty hat the colour of an over-cooked pie appeared at the farm gate, carrying a rifle. When I explained I was lost and had just had an unnerving experience, he took me into his kitchen and sat me down at a stained oak table while he made me tea and talked about the beast.

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litteacher8 | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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When the author refers to the “rickety, rotting footbridge,” “ominous words,” “Wild Big Cats- Keep Out” and the rifle, she creates a mood of foreboding darkness.  We feel that something bad is going to happen.  The story is a newspaper article about a legend of a supernatural cat, so it makes sense that the writer would want to create a spooky mood to help the reader feel like he or she was there.  The last sentence is particularly ominous.

When I explained I was lost and had just had an unnerving experience, he took me into his kitchen and sat me down at a stained oak table while he made me tea and talked about the beast.

From this we know that the speaker is struggling and frightened.  She talks about the “beast,” and being lost.  All of the components of a typical horror story are there, and the reader begins to get more and more interested.  We are in suspense, and want to know what is going to happen next.

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