Select words and phrases these describtions, and explain how the writer has created effects by using this language. A little further along I took a turning with a handwritten sign pointing to...

Select words and phrases these describtions, and explain how the writer has created effects by using this language.

A little further along I took a turning with a handwritten sign pointing to ‘Gables Farm’. I had to leave the car and cross a rickety, rotting footbridge over a rushing stream. Another battered sign, nailed to a tree, bore the ominous words, ambiguously addressed: ‘Wild Big Cats – Keep Out’. A shiny, weather-beaten man with tremendous whiskers and a crusty hat the colour of an over-cooked pie appeared at the farm gate, carrying a rifle. When I explained I was lost and had just had an unnerving experience, he took me into his kitchen and sat me down at a stained oak table while he made me tea and talked about the beast.

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mchristel | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Adjunct Educator

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The first thing you need to consider is the writer's use of descriptive words and phrases that describe the environment and the characters within that setting. Look at the phrase "rickety, rotting footbridge".  What connotation do those words convey?  That doesn't seem to be a safe or inviting place.  Those words "show" that this character is entering a situation that might present a challenge or threat.  The next sentence presents the word "ominous" to describe the impact of the words on a sign that directly tells the reader something in that situation will pose a threat to the character.  Often passages don't provide a word that announces the intended effect like this one does.  Often passages create an effect through describing rather than stating details, which requires the reader to make inferences.

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