Is this sentence grammatically correct?Scout tries to show patience. This is not an easy task for her.  

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litteacher8 | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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Scout tries to show patience.  This is not an easy task for her.

Your sentence is actually two sentences, and they are grammatically correct.  A sentence has to be a complete sentence to be grammatically correct.  It has to have a subject (a noun) and a verb.  Both of your sentences have a subject and a verb.

If you are worried about run-on sentences, a run-on sentence is a sentence created by combing sentences without using a coordinating conjunction.  For example, if you had written this, it would be a run-on.

Scout tries to show patience this is not an easy task for her.

Instead, you wrote:

Scout tries to show patience.  This is not an easy task for her.

This is two sentences.  If you want to combine them, you have two options.  Both of your sentences are independent clauses, which just means that each is a complete sentence on its own.  You can join them in two ways.

You can combine these two independent clauses with a conjunction or a semicolon to make a compound sentence.  The coordinating conjunctions you can use are for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so (you can remember them as FANBOYS).  Of course, you want to choose one that makes sense.  I would suggest either “yet,” or “but.”  You could also use “and” but I don’t think it works as well.

Scout tries to show patience, but this is not an easy task for her.

Scout tries to show patience, yet this is not an easy task for her.

 

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