Scout says that "Atticus was feeble" in To Kill a Mockingbird. Do you think that this is her view as she tells the story or her view when she was younger, and has her opinion changed by the end of...

Scout says that "Atticus was feeble" in To Kill a Mockingbird. Do you think that this is her view as she tells the story or her view when she was younger, and has her opinion changed by the end of the chapter?

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bullgatortail | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

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Harper Lee's innovative use of narrative--by a young Scout with the benefit of her knowledge as told from a future, adult perspective--is one of the stylistic achievements of the novel. It allows her to make childlike comments, like she does when she calls Atticus "feeble" in Chapter 10, and then reflect upon her own innocence afterward. There is no doubt that it is the young Scout who looks upon her father as someone who "didn't do anything." It may be true that Atticus is older than the other fathers and that he doesn't risk playing football, but it is clear that Scout is proud of her father after she discovers his secret marksmanship skills. She also sees the courage he possesses merely to face the mad dog and take the shot after such a long absence. There are many more instances that Scout's narrative reveals about her admiration for Atticus's strength of character--standing up to the lynch mob and taking heat from the community for defending Tom: facts that she only discovers as she matures and reflects upon as she ages.

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