While Scout awaits the jury's return, she is overcome with an impression that reminds her of a feeling she had the winter before. Explain.Compare Atticus's response to Jem's question "how...

While Scout awaits the jury's return, she is overcome with an impression that reminds her of a feeling she had the winter before. Explain.

Compare Atticus's response to Jem's question "how could they do it?" to Dolphus Raymond's reason telling the children his secret in chapter 20.

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katemschultz | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Associate Educator

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Your first question: Scout is overcome with the same feeling as when Atticus shot the mad dog. In both situations, Scout witnesses her father do something that most other men couldn't and wouldn't do. She sees her father step up to the plate and do what has to be done at the time, regardless of whether society deems it as "right" or "wrong"--he does the morally correct thing.

Your second question: Both Dolphus Raymond and Atticus are saying that kids get it. Kids don't see black and white people; they just see people. Kids can see the unfairness of the verdict from the trial and are innocent enough that Dolphus Raymond can explain his reasoning to them and they won't judge him. Most adults, however, and especially adults in Maycomb, have been socialized and educated in the ways of bias and prejudice that they can only see in tunnel-vision: Tom Robinson is guilty because he is black--nothing else matters. Dolphus Raymond is a drunk, and he doesn't know any better than to live with the Negroes--because Negroes, in their tunnel vision, cannot be good, friendly or innocent. Children don't have this tunnel vision yet.

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