What is a quantitative experiment on the influence of ph or temperature on the activity of enzymes?1.relate the chemical structure of an enzyme to its specificity and the catalytic activity....

What is a quantitative experiment on the influence of ph or temperature on the activity of enzymes?

1.relate the chemical structure of an enzyme to its specificity and the catalytic activity.

2.design a quantitative experiment to investigate  the influence of pH or temperature on the activity of an enzyme.

3.Describe what information concering the structure of an enzyme could be inferred from your experiments.

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trophyhunter1 | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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Enzymes are organic catalysts and very specific as to which substrates they interact with. They are proteins with a specific shape. Their active site is where they bind to a specific substrate and catalyze a reaction. A quantitative experiment that can be conducted is the influence of temperature on the action of an enzyme. Catalase, an enzyme present in cells,  causes hydrogen peroxide, a toxic substrate to break down into water and oxygen. Therefore, if small pieces of liver which naturally contain the enzyme catalase, were placed in three different test tubes; one containing room temperature water, one with ice water and one with boiling water, and the same amount of hydrogen peroxide was added to each test-tube, one could measure the amount of bubbling in each test tube and the length of time, the bubbles were produced and place these numbers in a data table. This is quantitative data. If the catalase enzyme is affected by temperature, there might be less or no bubbling, indicating that hydrogen peroxide was not breaking down into water and oxygen gas and the enzyme couldn't work. Denaturation affects an enzymes shape and active site. Temperature extremes can cause an enzyme to become denatured and thus not be able to catalyze a reaction.

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