Science and Religion Why most of the scientifics (specially in physics) are atheists? I've already written an essay of the aspects in which both science and religion contradict each other, but I wanted to know other people's opinion. It's sort of poll of a statistical's task. I'll be grateful if you help me!

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The simplest way I can explain it is that science is based on fact while religion is based on faith. Religion asks us to take it on faith that certain things occured. Science is never satisfied with less than an absolute, proven answer. Since God cannot be proven nor disproven,...

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The simplest way I can explain it is that science is based on fact while religion is based on faith. Religion asks us to take it on faith that certain things occured. Science is never satisfied with less than an absolute, proven answer. Since God cannot be proven nor disproven, science generally rejects God. We can prove that the grass is green. We can even prove why the grass is green. We cannot prove nor disprove that God created the grass. Scientist seek for absolutes, but religion asks us to believe in what we cannot physically prove, to have faith.
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Here's a link that may be helpful to you:

http://blogs.physicstoday.org/thedayside/2011/04/thoughts-on-this-years-templeton-prize.html

It leads to other interesting information and sources.  Here's a discussion of one of the sources mentioned in the link above:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/05/28/AR2010052801856.html

I have no idea how trustworthy any of these sources are, but they certainly seem worth examining.

 

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My favorite minister in my youth was a fairly liberal Presbyterian who believed in both God and evolution. He did not take the word of the Bible literally, but he was true to his faith and his congregation. For example, when God created the world in seven days, he explained, these were not 24 hour days but stages of life that took place over millions of years. This combination of religious faith and belief in science is probably more common than you think--even in the scientific community.

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I think that the previous post is probably right about why scientists aren't literalists (why they don't believe in the Bible or other holy books as statements of scientific fact).  However, I don't really think this is the same as atheism. You can easily believe that there is a God but that the Bible is not the literal word of God.

I think that scientists have the sort of mindset (in order to become good scientists) that demands proof and has a hard time believing in things in the absence of faith.   Their training and inclinations push them away from believing in God because they cannot prove his existence (even though they can't disprove it either).

So, I think the thing is that the mindset and ways of thinking that you need to be a good scientist are not very compatible with taking things on faith.

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