school and work for children it is best?school and work for children it is best?

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litteacher8's profile pic

litteacher8 | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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Working while in school is very difficult. Other than helping the family business or doing odd jobs, I don't think kids should work before they are in high school, and then only during the summers unless they are very mature and dedicated. It's hard to study and work.
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ask996 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Senior Educator

Posted on

Sometimes though, jobs are fostering responsibility in the wrong people, and the people working are sacrificing education. I have several students who have to work long hours just to help their families make ends meet. This is what families do in times of crisis, but then those same students come to school and want to sleep because they are exhausted from their jobs. Something has to be sacrificed, and some are sacrificing their education.

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slchanmo1885 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator

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I'm sure it depends on the person. Some can successfully juggle school and an outside job, which can teach responsibility and provide the student with spending money. However, for others, an outside job on top of a heavy workload may be too much. When I was in High School I didn't work during the school year, but worked during the summer. I always tried to pursue a summer job that helped me build my resume and work towards my career as a teacher. For example, I taught swimming lessons and taught summer camp. I knew that I wanted to go into education, so I figured I could hone my skills and gain experience while still making some money. 

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accessteacher | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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I actually, although I can understand that some students struggle balancing work and study, for me personally, it was great studying alongside having a job - it really taught me great time management skills and likewise helped me in my own budgeting. Now that I am a teacher I have continued to study outside of my job which I am able to do precisely because I have had that experience of time management. So I am all for it!

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besure77 | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) Senior Educator

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I would agree with the previous post. Jobs foster responsibility. I do think that it is important that students are receiving good grades before they are allowed to go to work. If they are not responsible enough to keep their grades up then I do not see how they can be responsible enough to keep a job.

 

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M.P. Ossa | College Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

This question should be rephrased so we can understand exactly what you are asking.

From what I could infer, you may be asking whether school and work for adolescents (particularly high schoolers) is a best practice for their development.

In reality, both are interdependent of one another. Work enriches the social, psychological, and financial life of the student, plus invites him to establish a budget, and to be more independent from the parents. School, of course, rounds the student completely and prepares them for the future. Yet, the experiences that the student takes from work onto the school and vice versa make their lives more full and rounded.

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kim-c | Student, College Freshman | (Level 1) Honors

Posted on

As a student, I don't have a job. Most kids in my grade started getting jobs in year 10 but I'd always find that I can barely keep up with my studies and assignments even without a job so there's no way I'd be able to if I have a job.

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nusratfarah | (Level 1) Valedictorian

Posted on

For a student, the first priority is study, then comes job. But, I think, if the student is poor and need to work for bearing the expenses of his study, then work and study can go on together.

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