Schlosser concludes Chapter 8, "The Most Dangerous Job," recounting the trials of Kenny Dobbins. What is the effect of his placing the dramatic story at the conclusion of the chapter rather than at...

Schlosser concludes Chapter 8, "The Most Dangerous Job," recounting the trials of Kenny Dobbins. What is the effect of his placing the dramatic story at the conclusion of the chapter rather than at the beginning? Do you see similar patterns of organization in other chapters? If so, which chapters?

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jameadows eNotes educator| Certified Educator

Schlosser presents the story of Kenny Dobbins, a worker in a slaughterhouse who was injured several times and then fired by his company, at the end of a chapter about slaughterhouse operations and how they work. Schlosser puts this story at the end of the chapter to illustrate the personal effect that the industry has on workers like Dobbins, an illiterate man who destroyed his body working in a slaughterhouse. Chapter 4 is set up in a similar way. In that chapter, Schlosser speaks about the promises of fast-food chains, and then, later in the chapter, he includes the stories of people such as Dave Feamster and his employees at Little Caesar's franchises, who show how hard it is to make a living as a franchise owner. Schlosser concludes Chapter 4 with a speech by Christopher Reeve that shows the hollowness of what the fast food industry is trying to achieve (as Reeve emphasizes caring and other humane values). In a similar way, Dobbins's story shows the hollow promises of the owners of the slaughterhouses.

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