The Glass Menagerie Questions and Answers
by Tennessee Williams

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In scene two of The Glass Menagerie, please give an example of irony.    

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In scene two, Amanda comes home and accuses her daughter of deception. Amanda tells Laura that she had just visited the business school to inquire about her progress and discovered that she had not been attending. Amanda is not only upset about losing the fifty dollars, but she also worries about her daughter's future. Amanda wonders what will become of Laura, who cannot work because she is too sensitive and does not have any gentlemen callers. Amanda then tells Laura,

"I know so well what becomes of unmarried women who aren't prepared to occupy a position. I've seen such pitiful cases in the South—barely tolerated spinsters living upon the grudging patronage of sister's husband or brother's wife!...encouraged by one in-law to visit another—little birdlike women without any nest—eating the crust of humility all their life! Is that the future that we've mapped out for ourselves? I swear it's the only alternative I can think of!" (Williams, 12).

Ironically, Amanda is describing her...

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