During chess games, how does Meimei apply her mother's strategy of winning arguments and her ideas on how to respect others?

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According to Meimei's mother, the strategy of winning arguments involves the necessity of knowing one's opponent. In order to achieve such knowledge, it is imperative that one acquires foresight, patience, and insight.

When Meimei asks questions about chess, her mother directs her to study the game for herself. She encourages Meimei to develop the necessary skills she needs in order to excel in the game. Later, by studying the game intimately and learning powerful, secret moves that can devastate any opponent, Meimei is able to become a chess champion. Above all else, Meimei's mother emphasizes the necessity for humility. Over-confidence can be costly; instead, the focus must always be on strategy, knowledge, and patience.

So Meimei applies her mother's strategy in chess games by quietly evaluating her opponents and utilizing secret moves to neutralize threats. She is quiet and unassuming in her manners, and she never lets on that she knows more than anyone else. In one game, even though her fifteen-year-old opponent regards her with disdain, Meimei does not return the favor. Instead, as her mother advises, she concentrates on forming a strategy to defeat him.

"Blow from the South," it murmured. "The wind leaves no trail." I saw a clear path, the traps to avoid. The crowd rustled. "Shhh! Shhh!" said the corners of the room. The wind blew stronger. "Throw sand from the East to distract him." The knight came forward ready for the sacrifice. The wind hissed, louder and louder. "Blow, blow, blow. He cannot see. He is blind now. Make him lean away from the wind so he is easier to knock down." "Check," I said, as the wind roared with laughter. The wind died down to little puffs, my own breath.

It is Meimei's focus on wielding the best defense and attack moves that leads her to victory in this particular game. Also, she distracts her opponent from recognizing her strategy until the very last moments. When he does realize it, however, it is too late, and Meimei is able to field her final, powerful moves to defeat him.

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This is a great question. In the beginning of the story, Waverly admits that she learned the art of invisible strength from her mother, but little did she know that it would be useful in chess.  

As she started playing chess and getting good, she learned that she had a gift.  She learned to use this idea of invisibility well to her advantage. Within the context of chess, it is the idea of seeing things others cannot.  Moreover, it is setting people up for a fall later.  In one instance, Waverly said that she sacrificed her knight to set a trap.  Shortly after, she was in a position of strength. Shortly after that, the chess game was nearly over and she checked her opponent. The way she describes this victory is by the illustration of the art of invisible strength. I will quote in full.

A light wind began blowing past my ears. It whispered secrets only I could hear. "Blow from the South," it murmured. "The wind leaves no trail." I saw a clear path, the traps to avoid...The wind blew stronger. "Throw sand from the East to distract him." The knight came forward ready for the sacrifice. The wind hissed, louder and louder. "Blow, blow, blow. He cannot see. He is blind now. Make him lean away from the wind so he is easier to knock down." "Check," I said, as the wind roared with laughter.

 

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