A Rose for Emily Why does "A Rose for Emily" seem better told from the narrator's point of view than if it were told from the point of view of the main chatacter?

A Rose for Emily

Why does "A Rose for Emily" seem better told from the narrator's point of view than if it were told from the point of view of the main chatacter?

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amy-lepore eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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You've got a lot of questions here, and I am limited on space. In my opinion, the foreshadowing does not give away the ending. If anything, it enhances the ending as the first-time reader definitely does not expect the iron-gray hair on the pillow next to a rotten corpse.

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blondie2 | Student

What general observations about society that Faulkner depicts can be made from his portraits of Emily and Homer and from his account of life in this one Mississippi town?

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blondie2 | Student

Does the foreshadowing in the story give away the ending? Did they heighten your interest?

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