Rosalind outshined Orlando in the play. How?'Rosalind is one of the most lively and intelligent of Shakespeare's heroines'. With special reference to Act 4-SceneI please show how Rosalind outshines...

Rosalind outshined Orlando in the play. How?

'Rosalind is one of the most lively and intelligent of Shakespeare's heroines'. With special reference to Act 4-SceneI please show how Rosalind outshines her beloved Orlando?

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sensei918 eNotes educator| Certified Educator

In Act IV, Scene I, Rosalind, in her guise as the boy Ganymede, is coaching Orlando in the art of wooing her. Orlando seems not to realize that he is actually dealing with the real Rosalind, though Shakespeare does occasionally drop hints that he just might not be as clueless as the audience thinks he is.  Rosalind surpasses her lover in wit and quick repartee, punning on his comments and treating him in a lightly mocking manner. She seems to be far more clever than Orlando, but, then again, she has him at a disadvantage because he does not know with whom he is speaking.  Rosalind's intelligence and good humor really shine in this scene, from her conversation with the morose Jacques at the beginning, to her wooing instructions to Orlando on how to win his Rosalind.

Rosalind even has Celia "marry" them in practice for the later real ceremony. Orlando, throughout all this, acts like a lovesick lad, and Rosalind, though she clearly loves Orlando, is in complete control of the situation and gets him to do exactly what she wants. She speaks truly when she tells him: "make the doors upon a woman's wit and it will out at the casement; shut that and  'twill out at the keyhole; stop that and 'twill fly with the smoke out at the chimney."