In Act 1, Scene 5 of Romeo and Juliet, how does Tybalt react to Romeo's presence at the party and what does Lord Capulet say about Romeo?

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Act 1, scene 5, shows Tybalt infuriated over Romeo's presence at the Capulet ball: "Now, by the stock and honour of my kin, / To strike him dead, I hold it not a sin." Lord Capulet tells Tybalt to ignore Romeo's presence and insists Romeo's reasons for attending are not malicious: "Therefore be patient, take no note of him." Tybalt, however, cannot hide his anger, and the scene foreshadows his eventual fight with Romeo. 


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In Act I, Scene 5 of Romeo and Juliet, Tybalt is enraged by Romeo's presence at the party at which Romeo falls in love at first sight with Juliet. Tybalt says:

"What dares the slave/Come hither, cover’d with an antic face,/
To fleer and scorn at our solemnity?/Now, by the stock and honour of my kin,/To strike him dead, I hold it not a sin."

Tybalt is quick to be angry and assumes that Romeo has come out of spite, to "scorn" the Capulets, while Romeo has not come for that reason at all, but out of motives of love. Tybalt also expresses his willingness to kill Romeo, which he does not regard as a crime,...

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