In "Romeo and Juliet" how could Tybalt’s death have been avoided?

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troutmiller eNotes educator| Certified Educator

There really is no way around Tybalt dying.  It is necessary because it sets up the events that turn the play into a tragedy.  The fight scene here in act III is the climax of the play.  Along with that reasoning, Tybalt killed Mercutio, so it was inevitable that he would be targeted next.

Although, many readers want the happily ever after ending for Romeo and Juliet.   So, in that case, perhaps Benvolio and Mercutio could have helped keep Tybalt calm.  He was the one who came to them with a drawn sword.  He went after Romeo as soon as Romeo came into the scene.  To back up a little bit, Romeo should have told his friends about his new love (and marriage) to Juliet.  Then they would have understood that he was not going to fight back.  It wasn't because he was "wimping" out.  He was now family to Tybalt.

"I do protest, I never injured thee,
But love thee better than thou canst devise,
Till thou shalt know the reason of my love:
And so, good Capulet,--which name I tender
As dearly as my own,--be satisfied."

He is very calm and has no intention of fighting Tybalt.  His friends should have been informed so that they too could keep Tybalt cool.  However, that's not the case. Tybalt killed Mercutio, and Romeo lost it and avenged his friend's death.  Both Romeo and Tybalt were to rash.  They never thought through their actions.  They just jumped in with both feet.

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Romeo and Juliet

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