In Romeo and Juliet, Act 2, Scene 3, most of the Friar's speech features what literary or stage device?

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In Act 2, Scene 3 of Romeo and Juliet, the Friar's speech features an extended metaphor. As he carries a basket filled with herbs, he takes them out and examines them. While speaking about the herbs, he compares them to children who are born from nature's "womb" (line 11) and who suck on "her natural bosom" (line 12).

As the extended metaphor goes on, the Friar compares the nature of the weeds to the different personalities of children (and of people in general). He says that the weeds and plants all have different natures and goes on to say that they all possess something of value:

"Oh, mickle is the powerful grace that lies / In herbs, plants, stones, and their true qualities. / For naught so vile that on the earth doth live / But to the earth some special good doth give" (lines 15-19).

In other words, plants and weeds, like people, have "mickle" or a large amount of grace. Even the worst, most poisonous plants, the Friar says, also provide some good. Similarly, good plants can also be...

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