Romeo and JulietWhat exactly happens when the families notify the prince that their children have died?

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mwestwood's profile pic

mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

In accord with the mention of some ambiguity, the final action of "Romeo and Juliet" does seem to conflict somewhat with what has been told to the audience in the Prologue:

Doth, with their death, bury their parents' strife./The fearful passage of their death-mark'd love,/And the continuance of their parents' rage,/Which but their children's end, naught could remove,/Is now the two hours' traffic of our stage....

For, in the Prologue there is a suggestion that even the deaths of Romeo and Juliet do not reconcile the Montague and Capulet families, while in the final verses of Act Five, there are indications that Lord Montague and Lord Capulet are amicable to each other:

O brother Montague give me thy hand./This is my daughter's jointure for no more/Can I demand.

But I can give thee more:/For I will raise her statue in pure gold,/That whiles Verona by that name is known,/There shall no figure by such rate be set/As that of true and faithful Juliet.

 

 

scarletpimpernel's profile pic

scarletpimpernel | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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One more important element to the family tragedy is that Lady Montague (Romeo's mother) dies when she hears of her son's death.  When Lord Montague arrives at the scene in Act 5, Scene 3, he brings the the news that his wife is dead from her grief.

pohnpei397's profile pic

pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

What Pohnpei failed to mention is that while Romeo and Juliet were dead, their respective family heads decided to no longer hold their enmity against each other. Both Montague and Capulet extend to each other the respect they failed to show during the life of the two young lovers, and in fact Montague promises to build a gold statue to honor the memory of Juliet, and that no other would have greater value as long as Verona existed.

  Good catch -- I read the question as asking what the prince did!  My fault.

ask996's profile pic

ask996 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Senior Educator

Posted on

What Pohnpei failed to mention is that while Romeo and Juliet were dead, their respective family heads decided to no longer hold their enmity against each other. Both Montague and Capulet extend to each other the respect they failed to show during the life of the two young lovers, and in fact Montague promises to build a gold statue to honor the memory of Juliet, and that no other would have greater value as long as Verona existed.

pohnpei397's profile pic

pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

First of all, they don't tell the prince.  The watch (like police) bring the Prince to the graveyard.  Then the Capulets come and they and the Prince find out together what has happened.  After this, the Montagues come and the Prince tells them.

Then the Prince asks some questions and reads a letter to find out what happens.  He tells the two families that they pretty much had it coming and the play ends.

epollock's profile pic

epollock | (Level 3) Valedictorian

Posted on

The play seems to end on the dramatic high that it is now up to the families to reconcile and that they have paid too high a price to have been feuding in the first place. The play ends somewhat in an ambiguous manner with merely physical action as the resolution.

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