In "The Road Not Taken," why did the traveler find it difficult to make his choice on that particular morning? What impression do you form of the traveler?

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In Robert Frost’s poem “The Road Not Taken,” the traveler is making of choice of which path to take as he hikes through the woods. This becomes a modern metaphor for his life. As the traveler approaches a fork in the road he stops to examine both...

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In Robert Frost’s poem “The Road Not Taken,” the traveler is making of choice of which path to take as he hikes through the woods. This becomes a modern metaphor for his life. As the traveler approaches a fork in the road he stops to examine both for use. On that particular morning, the roads seem very similar, but one seemed to be a bit less worn, thereforehe decided to take that one while keeping the other one for another day. He knows he will never travel that way again, yet he is introspective saying, “I took the one less traveled by, And that has made all the difference.”

There are contradictions in the words as Frost tells the audience the two paths were quite the same, with the second one having a bit less wear on that particular morning. Later the traveler explains he took the one less traveled by and that made all the difference.

Since poetry is meant to be interpreted and appreciated, this one is generally associated the pursuit of individualism and adventure. Readers say the traveler was daring as he chose to take the path that “wanted wear” and feel this affected his life for years to come. Others feel Robert Frost was writing about his indecisive friend and the poem was never meant to carry its modern connotation of encouraging people to be adventurous and to follow their dreams. In either case, the traveler has to make a decision, which he looks back on pensively at the end of the poem.

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