In The Rhyme of the Ancient Mariner by Samuel Taylor Coleridge, what are the ship and the storm-blast compared to?

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At line 41 of The Rime of the Ancient Mariner , the mariner describes the ship's journey south into unknown waters. The storm-blast is described as having "o'ertaking wings," which gives the impression of a huge bird flying toward them and catching up to them. The bird is "tyrannous and...

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At line 41 of The Rime of the Ancient Mariner, the mariner describes the ship's journey south into unknown waters. The storm-blast is described as having "o'ertaking wings," which gives the impression of a huge bird flying toward them and catching up to them. The bird is "tyrannous and strong," meaning this is a bird that is unusually powerful as well as cruel, unjust, or oppressive. What type of bird might the poet have had in mind? The roc could be one option; it is a mythical bird that was large enough to carry away an elephant. Alternatively, the poet or the speaker may have had in mind a creature like a griffin or dragon that has wings but is not a bird. These creatures are more often associated with judgment or execution. You can see an artist's depiction of the winged storm at the link below.

The ship in this section is compared to a person who is pursued by a foe who is yelling at him. The person "forward bends his head," showing his fear and desire to get away from his pursuer. 

Both these images create a mood of danger and fear as the mariner's ship careens toward adventures that will not end happily. 

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