RESUME EDITING!!Who would like to edit and fix up my resume im a 15 year student and i need someone to fix up anything worng with it ???

11 Answers | Add Yours

kplhardison's profile pic

Karen P.L. Hardison | College Teacher | eNotes Employee

Posted on

In response to post 6 -

I'm not sure about America, but it's highly recommended in Australia to include a photo of yourself and an analysis of your abilities, including a very brief introspection, as said by our Department of Education. The analysis of oneself might be like this;

I thoroughly enjoy cooking, which is why I want to enter hospitality when I'm older. I have the ability to cook a range of meals, and have learnt general workplace safety rules in Food Technology and Cooking class. I believe I could be a valuable member of your team.

A photograph, as quoted from the Department of Education;

Is to assure professionalism of your resume document and for general reference.

Again, I don't know what it's like in American workplaces - maybe photos aren't necessary - but in Australia is generally recommended.

 

In the U.S. anything that unduly reveals identity, e.g., age, ethnicity, etc., and can inspire even unintended prejudicial and discriminatory reaction or action is disallowed. The only personal, identity revealing information to be included is Name, Address, Phone(s), email. Social Security number must be supplied to further verify identity UPON REQUEST UPON HIRE.

One current U.S. standard is to leave references off and replace them with the statement, "References available upon request." Also, keep your resume to 1 page.

If you are a student seeking your first job, it is suggested that you either put education in the first section OR, if you have significant experience, put internships and volunteer work and part-time employment in the first section, but only add part-time employment in the FIRST IF the employment is directly related to the field in which you are looking for employment: e.g., list first part-time work for a graphic design firm if looking for work in graphic design; etc. If your part-time work is in an field unrelated to that in which you seek employment, list it in the WORK EXPERIENCE section. Of course, if you have extensive work, internship, volunteer work in any field, you might consider making that your first section. As a student, your sections might go in one of these two orders (followed by specifics on employment details: EMPLOYMENT Company name, address, dates employed):

1.

EDUCATION

EXPERIENCE [clubs, sports, organizations, etc]

WORK EXPERIENCE [part-time work, after school work, family business work, etc]

2.

WORK EXPERIENCE [internships, relevant volunteer work, relevant part-time work]

EDUCATION

EXPERIENCE [clubs, sports, organizations, etc]

Be sure to watch your punctuation on everything!!

pacorz's profile pic

pacorz | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator

Posted on

In response to post 10, in the US a picture of yourself is not usually included on professional resumes. Unless one is going into an artistic sort of field, any informality or personalization of the resume is frowned upon here.

I think that a brief introspection such as you have described, while not that common on US resumes, might be a useful thing to include on the resume of a person who is not old enough to have much job experience listed.

e-martin's profile pic

e-martin | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

The general advice offered here should go a long way to helping you shape up your resume. If there are specific areas that you are worried about, let us know with some specific questions and we'll help you.

One more potentially important piece of advice is this - you can have as many versions of your resume as you want. A resume is not like an essay that you turn in for a grade once and then it's over. You can continue to tweak and adjust and re-write as much as you want.

 

vangoghfan's profile pic

vangoghfan | College Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

Microsoft Word offers resume templates, and other resume templates and models can easily be found through a Google search. One crucial thing is to get someone to look it over closely who has a good command of English and of grammar and punctuation.

booboosmoosh's profile pic

booboosmoosh | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

A great deal of good info. has been shared here. I think the personal information is really important. Along with your name, I would include not only an address, but your phone number and an email address. Because so much is being done over the Internet, giving an email contact is a good idea. Make sure your email address is appropriate so that it gives the impression of someone responsible and conservative. "Partyanimal123," for example, wouldn't make a great impression. You might want an email that is just for job searching. The last time I went this route (not too long ago), I found that if you end up looking for a job (and this is not just an in-class exercise), you may want to look at jobs with some of the job-searching sites online. Once they have your email, it can be hard to stop the mail from coming, or have your information shared perhaps not with retailers, but with colleges (for continuing ed., specialized training, etc.) or affiliated branches of the company helping you with the job search. How much easier not to have to sort through personal emails to find employment-related emails as well.

I would keep it brief! One page if at all possible. Succinct: bullet items using phrases or single words. Describe your skills as actions but with powerful descriptions. If you get along with others, work well in groups, make a note: superior interpersonal skills. Avoid cliches and flat descriptions: "good people skills."

Leave out the fluff. Pictures have been cited on some job-search sites as a potential addition, but I think I would try to be conservative. Remember, above all, if you're applying for a job for which there is a lot of competition (and that will probably be most jobs, especially in this economy), the person reading through the resumes is looking for people who stand out on paper. If it's too long, it may well end up in the trash. Bullets keep it from being wordy. This all can make a good impression.

rrteacher's profile pic

rrteacher | College Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

Many of the things listed in Post 4 are not necessary, and depending on the job you're after, might make the resume look a little unprofessional. A personal introspection, for example, is probably not going to be very useful to potential employers, and a photograph is not necessary. I do agree 100% that a good resume should have a statement of interests and career objectives, and that it should be absolutely honest while, as the post above says, highlighting relevant skills and attributes.

readerofbooks's profile pic

readerofbooks | College Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

One thing that might help you is to tailor make your resume based on the job that you are going for. In other words, one resume does not always do the trick. For example, if you are going for a teaching job, emphasize your teaching passion. If you are going for a service job, then underline your skill in this area. And make sure that there are no errors.

litteacher8's profile pic

litteacher8 | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

The first and most important thing you need to do is make sure there are no errors in spelling or grammar. Then, check to make sure you didn't fudge the truth anywhere. Be honest! Make sure you have contact information, and it's correct. Also, try to keep it to one page.
stolperia's profile pic

stolperia | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

If you would like to submit specific questions about parts of your resume and explain why you are concerned about those areas, someone can give you suggestions for revisions or improvements.

wanderista's profile pic

wanderista | Student, Grade 11 | (Level 2) Valedictorian

Posted on

In response to post 6 -

I'm not sure about America, but it's highly recommended in Australia to include a photo of yourself and an analysis of your abilities, including a very brief introspection, as said by our Department of Education. The analysis of oneself might be like this;

I thoroughly enjoy cooking, which is why I want to enter hospitality when I'm older. I have the ability to cook a range of meals, and have learnt general workplace safety rules in Food Technology and Cooking class. I believe I could be a valuable member of your team.

A photograph, as quoted from the Department of Education;

Is to assure professionalism of your resume document and for general reference.

Again, I don't know what it's like in American workplaces - maybe photos aren't necessary - but in Australia is generally recommended.

 

wanderista's profile pic

wanderista | Student, Grade 11 | (Level 2) Valedictorian

Posted on

Make sure you include in your resume;

  • Name
  • Date of Birth
  • Experience (if any - if you're going into hospitality, and you were a waiter beforehand, mention this - it really helps)
  • Education (how you're going academically, no specifically qualifications as you're 15)
  • Referees/References/Sources
  • A small introspection (analysis of yourself - your attitute towards work etc.)
  • A picture of yourself (specifically your face - make it formal)
  • Interests/Career objective (this is optional, but is really good when you're below 18)

The rest is optional, but the above really covers what you need.

We’ve answered 318,918 questions. We can answer yours, too.

Ask a question