Regarding the passage "The Chase" from An American Childhood, what is a good thesis about what Annie Dillard valued so much about the chase, and what it suggests about the quest to create a meaningful life?

In the passage "The Chase" from An American Childhood by Annie Dillard, the author values the joy that the chase brings her. The passage suggests the creation of a meaningful life involves immersing oneself totally in immediate experiences. A suitable thesis might be argue that real joy can only be found by living life to the fullest.

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To come up with a suitable thesis for these questions concerning "The Chase" from An American Childhood by Annie Dillard , it is important to analyze the passage carefully. It starts with a description of Dillard playing football with a group of boys. She writes about the difficulty of tackling...

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To come up with a suitable thesis for these questions concerning "The Chase" from An American Childhood by Annie Dillard, it is important to analyze the passage carefully. It starts with a description of Dillard playing football with a group of boys. She writes about the difficulty of tackling an opposing player. She realizes that is essential to fully commit to the tackle. "If you hesitated in fear, you would miss and get hurt" but "if you flung yourself wholeheartedly at the back of his knees" you might have a chance of stopping the ball.

She then tells of a winter's day when she is seven years old, and together with some slightly older boys she is throwing snowballs at passing cars. Unbelievably, one of the cars stops, the driver gets out, and begins to pursue Dillard and one of the boys. For block after block the chase continues. However, instead of being frightened, Dillard experiences profound joy. She writes:

It was an immense discovery, pounding into my hot head with every sliding, joyous step, that this ordinary adult evidently knew what I thought only children who trained at football knew: that you have to fling yourself at what you're doing, you have to point yourself, forget yourself, aim, dive.

When the man finally catches the children, despite imagining all sorts of tortures that the man could put her through, Dillard concludes that "if in that snowy backyard the driver of the black Buick had cut off our heads, Mikey's and mine, I would have died happy."

Why would Dillard have made such a statement? This brings us back to what Dillard valued about the chase and what it suggests about the quest for a meaningful life. Her point, and the thesis of this passage, is that profound joy can only be found in going all-out and living life to the full. Only then can someone experience the joy of a life well-lived.

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