Regarding Father Zossimas' reference to the book of Job, what is the point of Job confessing that his sons may "have sinned in their feasting?"

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In the Bible, God's servant, Job, is a holy man that loves God. When Satan appears in front of God and says that Job only worships him because God has blessed Job, God allows Satan to tempt Job, but only in a limited fashion. Job does not know anything about...

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In the Bible, God's servant, Job, is a holy man that loves God. When Satan appears in front of God and says that Job only worships him because God has blessed Job, God allows Satan to tempt Job, but only in a limited fashion. Job does not know anything about what is going on in the heavenly realms, however, so when disaster after disaster befalls him and even his wife advises him to "curse God and die," Job refuses. Job's custom was to pray for his family, especially his sons and daughters. They would often hold feasts that could last for days. There was much partying going on, drinking, etc. and after these feasts, Job would offer up a burnt offering to God and prayers "just in case" his sons might have sinned during these feasts. So when it says "his sons may have sinned in their feasting" this was Job covering all bases. Hopefully you will be able to apply this to the novel.

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