In "The Red Convertible," what are a character's traits, strengths, or weaknesses? As the story progresses, to what degree do his/her traits become more or less prominent, and how does that work...

In "The Red Convertible," what are a character's traits, strengths, or weaknesses? As the story progresses, to what degree do his/her traits become more or less prominent, and how does that work out for the character (does it have good effects or bad effects)?

Expert Answers
jameadows eNotes educator| Certified Educator

One character you could write about from "The Red Convertible" is Henry. He is a strong and still person at the beginning of the story. Lyman, his brother, observes Henry "asleep with his arms thrown wide." Driving around in the car he shares with his brother, Henry is clearly comfortable and at peace. Henry is also a subtly funny man who says, "I always wondered what it was like to have long pretty hair." Finally, Henry is a patient man who has a knack for working on his car. 

However, after he serves in Vietnam, Henry becomes scared and depressed. He is "never comfortable sitting still anywhere but always up and moving around." Instead of being still, Henry is forever restless. While Henry was always ready with a joke in the past, now "you couldn't get him to laugh." When Henry tries to laugh, it comes out like a choking noise. Henry changes after his military service, but he still enjoys working on his car and spending time with his brother, Lyman. By working patiently on the car, he begins to restore himself to health. His patience working on the car works out well for him and has good effects, as it helps him regain his sanity after his military service in Vietnam. He begins to feel restored before he perishes in the river. 

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The Red Convertible

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