Reading Funk?I've now finished the first two of The Hunger Games series (each read in one sitting) and am about to pick up the third.  I realize I'm a little behind with this trend, but I haven't...

Reading Funk?

I've now finished the first two of The Hunger Games series (each read in one sitting) and am about to pick up the third.  I realize I'm a little behind with this trend, but I haven't been so absorbed by a book in a long time.  I'm in that reading funk where I'm having a hard time consciously connecting back to reality.

So I'm wondering, what books have sucked you in recently, to the point where returning to the real world is a difficult transition?

Asked on by clairewait

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clairewait | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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What about when you start dreaming what you're reading? Ana Karenina affects me that way. Crime and Punishment does also but that is far more literary character psychosis than I can tolerate! I much prefer to get in a "funk" over Jane Austen. When I dream Austen, I improve my vocabulary and syntax.

Jane Austen: That is funny.

I also dreamt Dostoevsky when I was reading The Brothers Karamazov.  Dark and strange indeed.

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Karen P.L. Hardison | College Teacher | eNotes Employee

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What about when you start dreaming what you're reading? Ana Karenina affects me that way. Crime and Punishment does also but that is far more literary character psychosis than I can tolerate! I much prefer to get in a "funk" over Jane Austen. When I dream Austen, I improve my vocabulary and syntax.

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e-martin | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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Occassionally I re-read The Lord of the Rings trilogy and get completely engrossed.

Sometimes it's easiest to get wrapped up in books like that, page-turners, atmosphere-oriented, plot-churning adventures.

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stolperia | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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I'll add a very low-class viewpoint, but for a complete escape from anything heavy, I found the characters in Julia's Chocolates to be eccentric enough to be fascinating and real enough that I could completely identify (at times) with what they were thinking, feeling, and doing as a result. There is no social redeeming factor in the story, but I thoroughly enjoyed reading it and found myself reluctant to put it down.

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accessteacher | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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Well, I must admit to having a similar reaction when I read this trilogy. I don't think I have read any book so quickly for a long time. However, I also recently read The Wednesday Wars for the first time. I know this one has been out for a long while, but it was an excellent read. I am currently really "enjoying" No Country for Old Men and finding that my view on life is now very cynical as a result.

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litlady33 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Associate Educator

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I know exactly the feeling you're referencing, and I felt the same way with The Hunger Games. While I do love the classics dearly, they tend not to "suck me in" as some of these other, more contemporary young adult books do. With that said, the last book(s) that did that for me was The Maze Runner Trilogy. It's dystopian and similar to The Hunger Games in some ways, but also very different. I highly recommend it.

I think it is important that we find books like these that we can reccommend to our students. Yes, the classics are so important, but they will be exposed to the classics with our curriculum and most likely won't reach all students. If we can get excited about these other books and pass them on to students, and then have THEM pass them on to each other, I think we would be doing a wonderful thing.

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literaturenerd | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

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I loved the Hunger Games series. After reading the Twilight series, I began The House of Night. I like to think of it as Harry Potter meets Twilight. Outside of that, my reading right now is limited to the classics (working on my Masters). But, when I do have time to read for pleasure, I cannot help but pick up those novels my students are reading.

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belarafon | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

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The Vorkosigan Saga by Lois McMaster Bujold is a fantastic science-fiction series. I can't recommend it highly enough.

For fantasy, the Discworld series by Terry Pratchett. It's a humorous series, but as fleshed out as any "serious" fantasy book.

For mystery fiction, the Dortmunder series by Donald Westlake and the Rhodenbarr series by Lawrence Block are all top-notch, and funny as well.

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pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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Since you're talking Hunger Games, I don't have to feel bad about what I'm going to say.  Unlike the previous post, I can't go "classy" with Dickens.  For me, the Harry Potter books give me the same feeling that you are talking about here.  So does a series by SM Stirling in which he imagines the fallout from a catastrophe in which essentially all modern technology stops working.  At least with that one I can pretend that I care because it focuses on how human societies get put together and on the development of political systems.  I get really wrapped up in that kind of stuff even though it's low class...

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litteacher8 | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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I often get caught up in the books I am currently teaching.  Whichever book it is, I get transported to that world for the duration.  However, the books that most caught my attention have been those by Charles Dickens.  I go to another world.

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tbrowe | (Level 1) eNoter

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R.A. Heinlein's future history Series... I'm not sure there is a more engaging Character than LAzarus Long... Lazarus is the single most prominent character is Heinlein's works, constantly reinventing himself as he sees fit to meed the needs of the situation he is in.  Heinlein can be a little heady at times but is always entertaining.

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wolfpac | Student, Grade 9 | (Level 1) eNoter

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For me I would have to say it was the: Seven Realms books. I would spend hours just sitting there reading those books. My mom would sit there and call me and I would think that one of the characters was calling my name.

that was the first series that I have literally got grounded from reading because i would not do my chores right because i wanted to get back to my book so bad

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juliette12345 | Student | (Level 2) eNoter

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Phillip Pullman's Northern Lights trilogy, first time I read it was mind-numbingly dull, but I read it again recently and got sucked into the vortex of brilliant adventure.

Also A Million Little Pieces and My Friend Leonard by James Frey. Both excellent books which left me shellshocked.

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