Read the stanza below from Lewis Carroll’s poem Jabberwocky and choose the parts of speech categorization that most likely fits the gibberish words from the poem. ‘Twas brillig, and the slithy...

Read the stanza below from Lewis Carroll’s poem Jabberwocky and choose the parts of speech categorization that most likely fits the gibberish words from the poem.

‘Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
Did gyre and gimble in the wabe:
All mimsy were the borogoves,
And the mome raths outgrabe.

a. Gyre, gimble, and borogoves are likely verbs.
b. Brillig, raths, and wabe are likely verbs.
c. Mimsy, slithy, and mome are likely adjectives.
d. Brillig, borogoves, mimsy and slithy are likely nouns.

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amarang9's profile pic

amarang9 | College Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

Gyre and gimble are used as verbs. Gyre means to scratch or circle and gimble means to bore holes; both are used as verbs. These definitions come from Lewis Carroll's glossary. However, borogroves are supposedly parrots, so the word is a noun and (A) is incorrect. 

Raths are turtles, a noun. Wabe is the side of a hill (the "way before" side of the hill), also a noun. And brillig is also a noun meaning a time in the evening when broiling and grilling are done (around dinner time). So (B) is also incorrect. 

Mimsy means miserable or unhappy (presumably a combination of flimsy and miserable). Slithy is a combination of slimy and lithe, lithe meaning thin and flexible. Mome means solemn. Each of these three gibberish words are used as adjectives, so (C) is correct. 

In (D), brillig and borogroves are used as nouns but slithy and mimsy are adjectives so (D) is incorrect. 

Sources:
user3780031's profile pic

user3780031 | eNotes Newbie

Posted on

When one uses the definitions for parts of speech, one can determine what each word is by definition. For example, wabe is the object of the preposition in, so it has to be a noun since no other part of speech is the object of a preposition with the exception of a objective case pronoun.  It cannot be a verb.  It is interesting to examine this poem in light of the definitions. 

lkennedylkennedy's profile picture

lkennedylkennedy | eNotes Newbie

Posted on

c

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