Raymond's Run Questions and Answers
by Toni Cade Bambara

Raymond's Run book cover
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In "Raymond's Run," is Squeaky a dynamic or static character? Why?

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Gretchen Mussey eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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A dynamic character is someone who undergoes a significant inner change and alters their attitude, beliefs, thoughts, or perspectives by the end of the story. In Toni Cade Bambara's short story "Raymond's Run ," Squeaky is considered a dynamic character because she undergoes a significant inner change by the end of the story. At the beginning of the short story, Squeaky is portrayed as an extremely competitive, aggressive young girl, who is only concerned with defeating her competition in the annual May Day races. Squeaky is depicted as a rather callous, brash adolescent, who is protective of her mentally-disabled brother and is suspicious of her competition. Despite the fact that she does not personally know Gretchen, Squeaky views her with contempt and...

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In "Raymonds Run" Squeaky is a dynamic character because she grows over the course of the story. In the beginning of the book she is very competitive and often boasts about the fact that she is the fastest runner around. She even forces her brother to keep up with her because, while she loves and looks after her brother, her running comes first. She is the fastest runner and all her energy goes into maintaining that image of herself. Gretchen is another runner, who is almost as fast but defiantly threatens that image of herself.

Over the course of the book, Squeaky has an insight and grows up a little. Instead of having to be the best she wants to foster growth in her brother Raymond. Instead of making Raymond keep up with her so she can maintain her image as the fastest runner, she wants him to have something of his own. She even looks to her former competition more maturely and with respect. All these things we put energy into for our image but in the end we are people. The last line in the book she says "..'cause maybe we too busy being flowers or fairy's or strawberry's instead of something honest and worth of respect. You know, like being people."

Over the course of the book Squeaky goes from seeing everyone as competition to be crushed to not seeing others as competition and instead seeing them as other people.