In "Raymond's Run," is Squeaky a dynamic or static character? Why?

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A dynamic character is someone who undergoes a significant inner change and alters their attitude, beliefs, thoughts, or perspectives by the end of the story. In Toni Cade Bambara's short story "Raymond's Run ," Squeaky is considered a dynamic character because she undergoes a significant inner change by...

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A dynamic character is someone who undergoes a significant inner change and alters their attitude, beliefs, thoughts, or perspectives by the end of the story. In Toni Cade Bambara's short story "Raymond's Run," Squeaky is considered a dynamic character because she undergoes a significant inner change by the end of the story. At the beginning of the short story, Squeaky is portrayed as an extremely competitive, aggressive young girl, who is only concerned with defeating her competition in the annual May Day races. Squeaky is depicted as a rather callous, brash adolescent, who is protective of her mentally-disabled brother and is suspicious of her competition. Despite the fact that she does not personally know Gretchen, Squeaky views her with contempt and questions her intentions. During her big race, Squeaky looks across the track and sees her brother keeping up by running adjacent to her on the other side of the fence. Following the race, Squeaky experiences a change of heart and decides to concentrate on coaching Raymond. She understands that winning isn't everything and also views Gretchen with a new perspective. Squeaky no longer views Gretchen with contempt and believes that she can help her train Raymond. Squeaky's change of heart and new outlook on life make her a dynamic character.

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Squeaky is a dynamic, or changing, character because she matures through the course of the story "Raymond's Run." At the beginning of the story, she is relentlessly competitive and mainly thinks about winning. She walks down 34th Street like a pony to strengthen her knees, and she likes to brag in front of other people that she will win races. Squeaky does not get along with girls like Gretchen, who is also a runner, and she forces herself to smile at Gretchen when they are competing in a race together (but it is a fake smile).

While running in the May Day race, Squeaky begins to change. She suddenly realizes she has won enough races and she should now turn her energies to coaching her brother, Raymond, who is developmentally disabled, to run. At the end of the race, Squeaky smiles at Gretchen, as Squeaky comes to regard the other girl with respect rather than with wariness or a competitive spirit. By the end of the story, Squeaky is more interested in helping and respecting others than competing against them.

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