Before the race, in Toni Cade Bambara's "Raymond's Run," Squeaky says the following: "I run, that is what I am all about." How does this change by the end of story? 

1 Answer | Add Yours

literaturenerd's profile pic

literaturenerd | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

Squeaky (or Hazel Elizabeth Deborah Parker), the narrative voice in Toni Cade Bambara's "Raymond's Run," states openly in the opening of the story that she is the "fastest thing on two feet." She runs when things get too tough and when racing (claiming she always wins and running uis what she is all about). Squeaky is speaking to her friends about the May Day races. She boasts that she will win the race because she is the best. 

Prior to the start of the race, Squeaky states "you must win, you must win, you are the fastest thing in the world." During the race, Squeaky sees Raymond (her brother). She pictures him running. It is then that her perception of running, and winning, changes. No longer does she care if she won the May Day race. All Squeaky cares about is that she can help Raymond to carry on the family name of racing: "I can always retire as a runner and begin a whole new career as a coach with Raymond as my champion." Although she does come in first place, her win does not matter. Squeaky is no longer al about herself; she is about others. 

Sources:

We’ve answered 318,929 questions. We can answer yours, too.

Ask a question