Ralph "wept for the end of innocence, the darkness of man's heart, and the fall through the air of the true, wise friend called Piggy."In an interview, Golding said the he should have been "mouring...

Ralph "wept for the end of innocence, the darkness of man's heart, and the fall through the air of the true, wise friend called Piggy."

In an interview, Golding said the he should have been "mouring Simon instead". Agree or disagree?

Expert Answers
luannw eNotes educator| Certified Educator

I think the operative word in the Golding quote was "instead". I believe that Ralph should be mouring Simon "too" and not "instead".  Both Simon and Piggy saw the source of evil early in the story.  In chapter 5, both Simon and Piggy suggest that what they need to fear is not so much a separate beast, but rather, people.  Simon and Piggy sense that evil lurks within their group of boys.  Simon is the first to realize that each of them has the evil lurking within when he has his "talk" with the lord of the flies in chapter 8.  He is killed trying to enlighten the boys and to tell them that the "beast" on the mountain is just a dead parachutist.  He is killed trying to help. Piggy is killed trying to talk sense into Jack and his tribesmen.  He is trying to tell them they need to be civilized in order to survive.  Both Simon and Piggy are martyred and both were friends to Ralph.  Piggy was a close and loyal friend from the beginning whereas Simon was a friend, but he was originally a choir boy from Jack's choir.  Piggy was something of a whiner and he was unable to get anyone but Ralph to really listen to him.  Simon was liked by the littluns because he was kind to them, helping them get fruit they were too small to reach so Simon would have been more of a leader than Piggy.  Both boys should have been wept for.

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Lord of the Flies

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