A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry

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In A Raisin in the Sun, explain George's reference to Prometheus. How does this fit Walter's character?

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As was mentioned in the previous post, Walter criticizes George for his attire and education before George takes Beneatha on a date. As George is leaving, he says, "Good night, Prometheus!" (Hansberry, 88). Prometheus was the god who created man and stole fire from Mt. Olympus to give to mankind. Prometheus was later punished by Zeus for giving mankind fire and was chained to Mt. Caucasus, where an eagle would eat his liver daily for eternity. However, Hercules ends up killing the eagle and freeing Prometheus from his eternal punishment.

Walter shares several similarities with Prometheus. Both characters are considered creative individuals that follow through with their unpopular plans. Both Walter and Prometheus suffer throughout their lives and are punished for the decisions they've made. Walter is a conflicted individual who becomes extremely depressed and dejected after one of...

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