RAD childrenI teach a self contained SEBD class.  We have a 6 year old child who has been diagnosed with RAD (reactive attachment disorder).  I have done quite a bit of research on this topic;...

RAD children

I teach a self contained SEBD class.  We have a 6 year old child who has been diagnosed with RAD (reactive attachment disorder).  I have done quite a bit of research on this topic; however, none seem to offer "real" advice in dealing with this type of child.  Does anyone have any strategies on how to effectively work with a child like this?

Asked on by rhga75

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jennifer-taubenheim's profile pic

jennifer-taubenheim | Middle School Teacher | (Level 2) Assistant Educator

Posted on

I am attaching a link with info that is really useful on RAD. However, here are some good techniques.

-Establish eye contact with the student. Be firm and specific

-Remember to acknowledge good decisions and good behavior

-Gove consequences (or allow natural consequences) for poor decisions and poor behavior. Eg: "I see you didn't complete the work from this activity period. You may finish it at recess while the other children who chose to finish their work are at recess." Nothing mean, angry or spiteful- just the facts. Kids with RAD have a tough time with cause and effect thinking and have to be taught consequences. Token economy will generally not work for kids with RAD

-Consequencing is a good teaching technique. There is a consequence associated with all good and bad choices. Teach these consequences as they will not think of or recognize them without your direction

-Be consistend and specific. Confront each misbehavior and support each good behavior with direct language. Eg "You drew on the desk, so you clean it up" or "You completed the assignment. That's a good choice."

-Do not permit the child to control your behavior by threatening to throw a tantrum.

-Be sure to communicate acceptance of the child even when the behavior is unacceptable.

-Support the parents as much as you can.

-Remain calm and in control of yourself no matter what the child does. If they manage to upset you then they are in control, not you.

I have attached some more resources. Also try searching neuropsychology and "reactive attachment disorder." Neuropsychologists (especially Dr. Emily Stevens) have developed some great techniques for working with these kids. I have experience in this area as well. Feel free to contact me anytime.

www.ATTACh.org

WWW.Center4FamilyDevelop.com

http://www.center4familydevelop.com/helpteachrad.htm

http://www.brandonu.ca/academic/education/exceptional/Reactive%20Attachment%20Disorder.pdf

 

Creating Capacity for Attachment, Edited by Arthur Becker-Weidman & Deborah Shell, Wood ‘N’ Barnes, Oklahoma City, OK, 2005.

 

Creating Capacity for Attachment, Edited by Arthur Becker-Weidman & Deborah Shell, Wood ‘N’ Barnes, Oklahoma City, OK, 2005.

Attachment Facilitating Parenting video/DVD.  Center for Family Development, Arthur Becker-Weidman, Ph.D., 5820 Main St., #406, Williamsville, NY 14221

Building the Bonds of Attachment, 2nd.  Edition, Daniel Hughes, Jason Aaronson, NY, 2006.

lynn30k's profile pic

lynn30k | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator

Posted on

This is probably because most of the problems these children face are in the home setting.  A child w/RAD has a hard time trusting that the people raising him/her now, will continue to do so.  They then test the parents over and over and over.....

Probably the best thing you can do in the classroom is to take opportunities to remind the child how much the parents do.  The kids do not usually cause much trouble in the school as a direct result of RAD as they want those outside the home to like them.

sssserr's profile pic

sssserr | Student, Grade 11 | (Level 1) eNoter

Posted on

Now get out of here and go play! google2.

aweidman's profile pic

aweidman | eNotes Newbie

Posted on

Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy (Creating Capacity for Attachment) is an evidence-based and effective treatment for children with RAD.  The book has material in it that will be useful for educators and parents.  

Other texts I like alot and often recommend to educators are:

Attachment in the Classroom by Heather Geddes and

Inside I'm hurting by Bombier

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