Quotes regarding the theme of power in The Kite Runner. Can anyone help me find some quotes to support the theme power? Thank you.

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There are many quotes that deal with power. More importantly, we are able to look at power in different ways. One way we can look at power is the social structure of Afghanistan. Amir and Baba are from a higher social status. They have privileges, education, wealth, and the like....

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There are many quotes that deal with power. More importantly, we are able to look at power in different ways. One way we can look at power is the social structure of Afghanistan. Amir and Baba are from a higher social status. They have privileges, education, wealth, and the like. On the other hand, Hasan and Ali are servants a lower social status. They are Hazaras, who are powerless. Here is quote that shows the power differences:

That Hassan would grow up illiterate like Ali and most Hazaras had been decided the minute he had been born, perhaps even the moment he had been conceived in Sanaubar's unwelcoming womb – after all, what use did a servant have for the written word?

Another way to look at power is based on character such as courage. Baba says these words:

“A boy who won’t stand up for himself becomes a man who can’t stand up to anything.”

If we apply these words to Amir, then we see that Amir is lacking. He does not have courage, unlike Baba or even Hasan. In this sense, there is a powerlessness to Amir in view of fear, which diminishes him as a person and fills him with guilt.

At the end of the story, Amir redeems himself. He is beaten up badly by Assef, but he finally stood up for something right. Because of this fact, he gain power over Assef and his own guilt and shortcomings.

“My body was broken—just how badly I wouldn’t find out until later—but I felt healed. Healed at last. I laughed.”

That Amir can laugh says a lot.

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The theme of power is prevalent throughout the novel and is most poignantly illustrated by the way that the Pashtuns marginalize and oppress the Hazaras, who are ethnic minorities in Afghanistan. One day, Amir finds an Afghanistan history book in Baba's study and learns how the Pashtuns gained power over the Hazaras. Amir says,

In it, I read that my people, the Pashtuns, had persecuted and oppressed the Hazaras. It said the Hazaras had tried to rise against the Pashtuns in the nineteenth century, but the Pashtuns had "quelled them with unspeakable violence." The book said that my people had killed the Hazaras, driven them from their lands, burned their homes, and sold their women. The books said part of the reason Pashtuns had oppressed the Hazaras was that Pashtuns were Sunni Muslims, while Hazaras were Shi'a. The book said a lot of things I didn't know, things my teachers hadn't mentioned. Things Baba hadn't mentioned either. It also said some things I did know, like that people called Hazaras mice-eating, flat-nosed, load-carrying donkeys.

The history book's brief description of the conflict between the ruling Pashtuns and the oppressed Hazaras provides valuable insight into the relationships and interactions between the main characters of the novel. Baba and Amir are both privileged Pashtuns, while Ali and Hassan are minority Hazaras. Despite the fact that both Baba and Amir admire and love Ali and Hassan, they refrain from publicly acknowledging and expressing their love for their Hazara companions. Amir refuses to call Hassan his friend, and Baba does not acknowledge the fact that Hassan is his biological son because of the social pressure. Ali, Hassan, and Sohrab are forced to live difficult lives because of their ethnicity in the majority Pashtun nation of Afghanistan. Throughout the novel, Hosseini illustrates the balance of power between the ruling Pashtuns and the oppressed Hazaras, which dramatically affects how the main characters interact with each other.

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Power is one of the themes that run consistently through The Kite Runner. The power in Afghanistan shifts throughout the story: It is first held by the ruling Pashtuns, then the Russians and, later, the Taliban. Baba is one of the most powerful men in Kabul--rich, flamboyant, popular and philanthropic. When he flees the Russians after their takeover, Amir winds up working in a gas station--a considerable loss of the status he once held. His friend in San Jose, General Taheri, has a similar tale to tell. But despite their present conditions, the general has not forgotten the old Baba, and to him, power and greatness are things that can never be lost. The general tells his future son-in-law about Baba during their first meeting at the San Jose flea market.

"We Afghans are prone to a considerable degree of exaggeration... and I have heard many men foolishly labeled great. But your father has the distinction of belonging to the minority who truly deserves the label.
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