What are quotes and page numbers from the Count of Monte Cristo that represent various literary elements?

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Many of the quotes found throughout the book demonstrate the important literary device of characterization. The following quote is an example of direct characterization.

Dantès was now thirty-three years old, as we have said, and his fourteen years in prison had brought what might be described as a...

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Many of the quotes found throughout the book demonstrate the important literary device of characterization. The following quote is an example of direct characterization.

Dantès was now thirty-three years old, as we have said, and his fourteen years in prison had brought what might be described as a great spiritual change to his features. He had entered the Château d'If with the round, full, radiant face of a contented young man whose first steps in life have been easy and who looks to the future as a natural extension of the past. All that had changed utterly.

I cannot give an exact page number for the quote because page numbers will differ from edition to edition. However, I can narrow the quote location down quite a bit. The previous quote is from chapter 22, paragraph 9. Direct characterization occurs when the narrator specifically tells character details to a reader. In this quote, readers are directly told Dantès's age, a few details regarding his face, and the fact that a lot about him has changed. Two paragraphs later, we are told that his physical appearance had changed so much that Dantès does not even recognize himself.

In chapter 94, readers get this quote from Morrel.

"My God!" said Morrel. "You terrify me, Count, with your lack of emotion. Have you some remedy for death? Are you more than a man? Are you an angel? A god?" And the young man, who had never flinched from any danger, shrank away from Monte Cristo, seized with unspeakable terror.

This quote is also demonstrating characterization. However, it is indirect characterization. It is indirect characterization because we are discerning details about Dantès from Morrel's response. Morrel does give readers some flexibility in assessing who or what Dantès has become, but I would like to stress that the quote really shows Dantès's ability to become anything and anyone that he desires. It is a bit of an inhuman quality.

The next quote is from chapter 62, paragraph 5.

Like the Sleeping Beauty's castle, the whole house had been awakened from its long sleep and come to life; it sang and blossomed like one of those houses that we have long cherished and in which, when we are unfortunate enough to leave them, we involuntarily relinquish a part of our souls.

The quote is a good example of the narrator using a simile. A simile is a figure of speech that makes a comparison and shows a similarity between different things. Similes also make the comparison by using the word "like" or "as."

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The first quote I would like to provide is for the element of conflict.  In Ch. 4 Danglars writes a letter to cause a conspiracy for Edmund to be sentenced for treason to the Chateau d'If.  He states in the letter," "Proof of this crime will be found on arresting him."

The second element I will discuss is the theme of revenge.  It is noted in the very next section of Ch. 4 as a result of the conflict.  Danglars replies to Fernand, "now your revenge looks like common sense."

The element of character can be portrayed by M. Bertuccio in Ch. 44 when he describes himself as being "accomplished." He boasts to the count, "I accomplished the most astonishing deeds." This was during a discussion to the count explaining the speculative comings and goings he had witnessed on the part of M. Villefort around town years earlier.  Another character analysis can be illustrated in the same chapter for M. Caderousse, who displays greed in his dealing with the jeweler, as he bargains for more money for the ring.    Caderousse mumbles, "The abbe told me it was worth 50,000 franks."

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