What are some quotes and examples of when Holden Caulfield judged other people in The Catcher in the Rye?

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Holden Caulfield is portrayed as a cynical, jaded teenager who is extremely judgmental and critical of others. As a traumatized, neurotic adolescent, Holden fears growing up and entering the competitive world of adults. He views adults as complete phonies and believes that most people are insincere frauds who pretend to...

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Holden Caulfield is portrayed as a cynical, jaded teenager who is extremely judgmental and critical of others. As a traumatized, neurotic adolescent, Holden fears growing up and entering the competitive world of adults. He views adults as complete phonies and believes that most people are insincere frauds who pretend to be somebody they are not in order to preserve their reputations.

In chapter two, Holden demonstrates his judgmental personality by criticizing his former headmaster, Mr. Haas, for attempting to make a good impression on the parents when they visit. Holden says,

One of the biggest reasons I left Elkton Hills was because I was surrounded by phonies. That's all. They were coming in the goddam window. For instance, they had this headmaster, Mr. Haas, that was the phoniest bastard I ever met in my life. Ten times worse than old Thurmer. On Sundays, for instance, old Haas went around shaking hands with everybody's parents when they drove up to school. He'd be charming as hell and all.

In addition to viewing authority figures as phonies, Holden's judgmental personality also extends to his peers. Holden is severely critical of his annoying next-door neighbor, Ackley. Holden describes Ackley by saying,

The whole time he roomed next to me, I never even once saw him brush his teeth. They always looked mossy and awful, and he damn near made you sick if you saw him in the dining room with his mouth full of mashed potatoes and peas or something. Besides that, he had a lot of pimples. Not just on his forehead or his chin, like most guys, but all over his whole face. And not only that, he had a terrible personality. He was also sort of a nasty guy.

Holden also reveals that he is judgmental towards people he doesn't even know. When he takes Sally Hayes on a date to the theater, she runs into someone she knows and Holden immediately begins judging him. Holden says,

Then all of a sudden, she saw some jerk she knew on the other side of the lobby. Some guy in one of those very dark gray flannel suits and one of those checkered vests. Strictly Ivy League. Big deal ... Finally, though, the jerk noticed her and came over and said hello. You should've seen the way they said hello. You'd have thought they hadn't seen each other in twenty years. You'd have thought they'd taken baths in the same bathtub or something when they were little kids. Old buddyroos. It was nauseating.

Holden's assessment of Sally's friend depicts his critical, judgmental personality. Holden is also judgmental towards his brother D.B., who is a talented screenwriter in Hollywood. Holden mentions that he used to enjoy D.B.'s stories but accuses him of being a "prostitute" in Hollywood because he sacrificed his art for money. Holden's judgment also extends to the entertainment industry. He is severely critical of actors and critiques Sir Laurence Olivier's performance in Othello by saying,

He has a terrific voice, and he's a helluva handsome guy, and he's very nice to watch when he's walking or dueling or something, but he wasn't at all the way D.B. said Hamlet was. He was too much like a goddam general, instead of a sad, screwed-up type guy.

Overall, Holden has an extremely negative perspective and is severely critical of others. He often judges people based on their appearances and refuses to exercise sympathy or tolerance.

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In Chapter 10, Holden Caulfield ventures down into the Lavender Room, a nightclub in the hotel, to see what's going on. As soon as he sets foot inside the place, he starts making judgments on the people he sees:

Except for a few pimpy-looking guys, and a few whory-looking blondes, the lobby was pretty empty.

It says something about the way that Holden sees the world that he immediately starts judging complete strangers by comparing them to pimps and prostitutes before he's even had the chance to meet them. But even when he does get to meet them, he can't help making derogatory judgments about them. Holden invites a blonde woman onto the dance floor. She's impressed with his dancing abilities, as he is with hers. But that's about all she has going for her, he reckons:

She was really a moron. But what a dancer. I could hardly stop myself from sort of giving her a kiss on the top of her dopey head – you know – right where the part is, and all. She got sore when I did it.

"Hey! What's the idea?"

"Nothing. No idea. You really can dance," I said. "I have a kid sister that's only in the goddam fourth grade. You're about as good as she is, and she can dance better than anybody living or dead."

Faint praise indeed. But Holden judges everyone negatively, not just women. He's forever passing judgement on his schoolmates and masters, usually employing the word "phony." Ernest Morrow's one such character. Holden really doesn't like him at all. In fact, he hates his guts:

[T]he biggest bastard that ever went to Pencey, in the whole crumby history of the school. He was always going down the corridor, after he'd had a shower, snapping his soggy old wet towel at people's asses. That's exactly the kind of a guy he was. (Chapter 8)

But when he meets his mother on board a train, he plays along with the phony image she has of her son:

"Well. He's a very sensitive boy. He's really never been a terribly good mixer with other boys. Perhaps he takes things a little more seriously than he should at his age."

Sensitive. That killed me. That guy Morrow was about as sensitive as a goddam toilet seat. (Chapter 8)

Then again, Holden hasn't identified himself to Mrs. Morrow. He's adopted the phony persona of Rudolf Schmidt, the janitor at Ossenburger Hall. So, in other words, he's had to be a phony in order to act phony around a phony's mother.

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In Chapter 3 of The Catcher in the Rye, Holden Caulfield talks about the man his wing is named for, Ossenburger. Ossenburger gave a speech to the students and implored them to have a relationship with Jesus Christ. "He said he talked to Jesus all the time. Even when he was driving his car. That killed me. I just see the big phony bastard shifting into first gear and asking Jesus to send him a few more stiffs." Holden is critical of most adults for being "phonies" and he faults Ossenburger for making a fortune in the undertaking business, essentially profiting from the dead. 

Holden has a lot of friends at Pencey but in his asides, he criticizes them for all of their faults. But he never criticizes himself. When he leaves at the end of Chapter 7, we see this duplicity when he says "Sleep tight, ya morons!" He said this as a way to convince himself that he isn't sad for leaving and also to convince the others (if they even woke to hear it) that he didn't need them and could leave without any sad feelings. 

Holden also criticizes his brother D.B. for being a screen writer. However, Holden constantly makes references to movies, so they have made an impression on him. In Chapter 18, Holden criticizes (in thought) a woman for crying during a movie. He has some justification because the woman won't take her child to the bathroom, but his criticism is, once again, about phoniness in general, with adults in particular. "You take somebody that cries their goddam eyes out over phony stuff in the movies, and nine times out of ten they're mean bastards at heart. I'm not kidding."

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