The Rime of the Ancient Mariner by Samuel Taylor Coleridge

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Quote two examples of internal rhyme and two examples of alliteration in The Rime of the Ancient Mariner.

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By definition, there are actually three types of internal rhyme.  They are:

  1. Two or more rhyming words within the same line
  2. Two or more rhyming words in the middle of two separate lines 
  3. A word that ends a line rhymes with one or more in the middle of the next line.

Coleridge uses two rhyming words within the same line in the third line of the second stanza: "The guests are met, the feast is set."

Coleridge again uses this type of internal rhyme in the line "The game is done! I've won! I've won

Alliteration is the use of repeated (usually) consonant sounds in two or more successive words. 

Coleridge begins the first line of stanza three using alliteration with the sound of "h." The line reads "He holds him with his skinny hand." The alliteration in this line is further enhanced by the "h" sound at the end of "with," though this is technically not alliteration since it appears at the word's end. 

Coleridge again uses alliteration in the line:  "The furrow followed f ree;" with repetition of the sound...

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