Quotation Analysis for Edgar?Hey, I need some help with English, here's the question Act 3 Scene 6 100-113 EDGAR When we our betters see bearing our woes, We scarcely think our miseries our foes....

Quotation Analysis for Edgar?

Hey,
I need some help with English, here's the question

Act 3 Scene 6 100-113

EDGAR

When we our betters see bearing our woes,
We scarcely think our miseries our foes.
Who alone suffers suffers most i' the mind,
Leaving free things and happy shows behind:
But then the mind much sufferance doth o'er skip,
When grief hath mates, and bearing fellowship.
How light and portable my pain seems now,
When that which makes me bend makes the king bow,
He childed as I father'd! Tom, away!
Mark the high noises; and thyself bewray,
When false opinion, whose wrong thought defiles thee,
In thy just proof, repeals and reconciles thee.
What will hap more to-night, safe 'scape the king!
Lurk, lurk.

What are 3 literary devices in this passage? Give an example for each.

What does each mean/What does it do? What information does it provide about the play?

Even if you can list 1 or 2, it's better than nothing :)

Thanks in advance!

Expert Answers
lynnebh eNotes educator| Certified Educator

In this scene, Edgar is pretending to be mad to disguise himself because his brother has tried to frame him. His father Gloucester, along with Kent, King Lear and Lear’s Fool are hiding in a farmhouse on Gloucester’s land. Gloucester leaves to find food for Lear, and Lear holds a mock trial for his daughters that he believes have betrayed him. Edgar and Lear’s Fool speak like they are crazy during the mock trial and the trial is quite bizarre. When Gloucester comes back, he tells Kent that he has overheard the plot to kill Lear and asks Kent to bring Lear to Dover where people are waiting to protect him. Everyone leaves except Edgar, and he is now speaking in his real voice, not the voice of a madman. In this passage, he explains that his own suffering doesn’t come close to what the King has suffered.

When we our betters see bearing our woes,
We scarcely think our miseries our foes

In these lines, there is personification – “misery” is an emotion and cannot really be our enemy except in a poetic sense. Edgar is saying that when he sees how much Lear (“his better”) is suffering, his own misery does not seem so bad.

When that which makes me bend makes the king bow,

This is an example of metaphor. Edgar’s suffering is like someone bending over with pain, but the king’s suffering is really laying him low – he is bowing under its pressure.

When grief hath mates, and bearing fellowship.

This is another example of personification. Grief is not a person, and cannot have “mates” (friends”) or companionship (“fellowship”). Edgar says that when he sees the suffering of someone else (mates) it makes his own seem less.