In "The Cask of Amontillado", has Montresor accomplished the revenge that he wanted at the beggining of the story?His quote about his revenge...

In "The Cask of Amontillado", has Montresor accomplished the revenge that he wanted at the beggining of the story?

His quote about his revenge was:

"At length I would be avenged; this was a point definitely, settled --but the very definitiveness with which it was resolved precluded the idea of risk. I must not only punish but punish with impunity. A wrong is unredressed when retribution overtakes its redresser. It is equally unredressed when the avenger fails to make himself felt as such to him who has done the wrong."

Has he really accomplished the revenge he wanted above? Three reasons why?

Expert Answers
mwestwood eNotes educator| Certified Educator

Only two of the three criteria of Montesor in "The Cask of Amontillado" have been met for revenge: 

(1) Montesor has accomplished the revenge he wants because he has punished his enemy, Fortunato by walling him into the catacombs to die, and he has punished with impunity since he is telling the story years after the fact. 

(2) Montesor's matter-of-fact account indicates that he is satisfied with his revenge, so the retribution does not seem to overtake him.  His satisfaction is denoted by his final words, "In pace requiescat!"

However, it is questionable whether Montesor has "made himself felt as such to him who has done the wrong."  For, Fortunato misses Montesor's clues and seems "too astounded to resist" when Montesor tethers him to a wall.  As Montesor places brick upon brick, Fortunato utters shrill and loud screams, but never a protest about any past behavior or a question about why Montesor walls him in. Finally, Fortunato sadly, desperately ventures a laugh:  "Ha!...a very good joke ineed--an excellent jest.  We will have many a rich laugh about it..."  Fortunato only believes his entombment is some sick joke of Montesor's.  Then, he pleads, "For the love of God..." as though begging to know the reason for the narrator's behavior.  Thus, it cannot be concluded that the avenger has made himself felt as such to Fortunato, the third condition.

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The Cask of Amontillado

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