In Chapter 16 of The Sun Also Rises, why does Montoya want to protect Romero, and how does he do that? How does Jake react to the invitation from the American ambassador?How does his involvement...

In Chapter 16 of The Sun Also Rises, why does Montoya want to protect Romero, and how does he do that? How does Jake react to the invitation from the American ambassador?How does his involvement with Brett and Pedro contradict this? How does Montoya react?

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dymatsuoka | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

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Montoya wants to protect Romero because the boy is a prodigy in bull-fighting. Romero has a bright future, and Montoya does not want him spoiled by negative outside influences, like fame and women. He says,

"People take a boy like that. They don't know what he's worth...Any foreigner can flatter him...and in one year they're through."

When the American ambassador asks to meet with Romero and another bullfighter, Montoya, fearing that the invitation will be the beginning of unwanted distractions, does not know what to do. He asks Jake's advice on the matter, and Jake, understanding Montoya's concerns, tells him to simply not relay the message to Romero.

Later, however, Jake contradicts his original action when Brett asks him to arrange a date for her with Romero. Jake complies, knowing that Brett, as an "American woman...that collects bull-fighters," is exactly the kind of influence that will ruin the young man as Montoya fears. When Montoya comes by and sees his young protege

"with a big glass of cognac in his hand, sitting between (Jake) and a woman with bare shoulders, at a table full of drinks,"

he feels rightfully betrayed, and leaves the room without even nodding at Jake. By setting Romero up with Brett, Jake has lost the respect of the aficionados, who watch him from the bull-fighter table with "hard eye(s)" (Chapter 16).

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