In The Pearl, how does the description below affect what readers expect the pearl to mean to Kino, Juana, and Coyotito?Kino lifted the flesh, and there it lay, the great pearl, perfect as the moon....

In The Pearl, how does the description below affect what readers expect the pearl to mean to Kino, Juana, and Coyotito?

Kino lifted the flesh, and there it lay, the great pearl, perfect as the moon. It captured the light and refined it and gave it back in silver incandescence. It was as large as a sea-gull’s egg. It was the greatest pearl in the world.


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stolperia | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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Kino, Juana, and Coyotito have had almost nothing recognized by the world as having worth to this point in the story. Certainly they have had minimal material possessions in the past and, up until this moment, they had no prospects for changing their situation. Their strength has been within the family and their love for each other - a power that is undermined by the outside forces and by the ignorance and innocence that is exploited by those in worldly positions of authority.

With the discovery of this fabulous pearl, Kino sees in its beauty and its extraordinary worth the opportunity to better his family's situation. The description emphasizes the incredible appearance and perfection of the pearl. There is no flaw in it - it is "perfect" as it captured light and "refined it" to an even higher level of perfection. Kino cannot conceive of how such a perfect pearl can bring anything but beauty and glory and good to his family.

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